Tie The Knot Sri Lanka Style

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To be honest, one of my favourite types of weddings are cultural ones because of the colour and vibrancy of it all. This is the first time we’ve showcased a Sri Lankan wedding on WGA and I am pleased to say it looks fab. Enjoy :)

Couple:
Ganendra & Malini

Photographers: Grace & Andrew C from Stories by Integricity

Ceremony: Kalamandapam Hall, Brickfields

Malini looking beautiful in her sari…


A few words from Grace, one of the photographers: “When I first met Ganendra & Malini for the first time, they told me that they wanted to hire a photographer who could capture the moments and come up with creative shots. They said that they didn’t want a ‘traditional’ photographer for their wedding day. Of course, the difficult part was convincing their slightly more ‘traditional’ families that they are making the right decision.

Post wedding day and unveiling of the slideshow montage to the family, I was so happy when Malini’s mum came up to me and said “Grace, thanks for the wonderful photographs! You captured the emotions, not just the event.” I beamed :)”

As with traditional Indian weddings, Sri Lankan ceremonies also have rituals. For instance, on the wedding day both bride and groom get ready in their own home and go through different customs. For Ganendra the groom, he has a rather enjoyable (definitely looks it!) ‘bathing’ ceremony where he is doused with milk (Cleopatra style!).


The next step of the groom’s day is to make his way to the temple. But before he enters the hall, a blessing ritual called ararthi is conducted.

The temple rite is the religious segment of the day and is attended by close friends and family. In the photo above, the kaapu kattu ceremony starts with the breaking of coconut, after which the priest ties a holy string on the finger of the groom.


The bride then sits next to her groom and the thetham ceremony starts. This is where the bride is given away to the groom’s family. During the thetham, the priest will read out 3 names of paternal ancestors.


After the thetham, the bride changes into her wedding sari, the kurai. Then comes the best part of the day as the groom ties the thali around her neck – and voila they are married! Isn’t it interesting how different cultures use different motifs to symbolise love? For a church ceremony, you have the wedding ring, and for the Chinese, it’s the tea ceremony.

These photos were shot by Grace & Andrew C, photographers from WGA vendor Stories by Integricity. Be it pre-wedding pics, Malay or Chinese weddings, they always deliver! Get in touch with them by checking out their website or Little White Book page.

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